Lunching and brunching

Imagine entering a place where you can smell the fresh bread and the coffee, where people sit together at long pine tables and the only buzz is that of animated conversations? Enter the world of Le Pain Quotidien.

I have been dividing my Sundays between the restaurant on 11 Place Sablon and the one on Ave Louise 124. To me, Pain Quotidien offers the best solution to a brunch: a wide choice of bakery, croissants, and home made jams, the best bread ever, really generous coffee mugs, fresh orange juice – heaven. Then you have the lunch options, where you can chose between sandwiches where you can actually see the flavor before you taste it. And their salads, delicious! Fresh ingredients, a mix and match of food you would not normally imagine, fresh bread to accompany it and if ever the need be, red and white wine is on offer too.

So yesterday it was lunch in Pain Quotidien. I had a part of Italy on my plate, mozzarella di bufala, Parmesan, Parma ham, grilled aubergines and courgettes, sun dried tomatoes, you name it. And to end, what else than their world known chocolate cake (I know people in DC who travel to NY for this one …).

My love for Pain Quotidien can be summed up like this: I have been known to spend Sundays with a friend brunching, reading glossy magazines and discussing life for hours on end. Starting with breakfast, then taking long coffee breaks, deciding we can not possibly resist the salads, and maybe end with a glass of red wine? Average time: 5h.

An experience to be repeated.

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  • Piquant

    I now live in Vossem (Tervuren) and on one of my first trips to Brussels to visit my boyfriend he took me to Pain Quotidien and I fell in love with it. One of my very favorite things to do is go shopping at the nearby outdoor markets on Sunday morning and then head to Pain Quotidien to revel over breakfast in the Sunlight. You’ve inspired me to make my next trip there a five hour one!

  • Ronald Gruenebaum

    Nice place but the bread is what you get in Germany on every corner – as the standard bread, then come the special varieties. PQ is hyping whay is normal further east. French-speaking culture cannot do bread properly and only anglophones seem exitid about it (probably because it is fresh).